Agreement To Curtail Nukes

These two agreements, known together as the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks – or SALT – sounded the era of arms control between the two major nuclear powers. The document also calls for more smaller weapons on submarines and other platforms to attack enemies. Many experts fear that smaller nuclear weapons will make them more usable, increasing the likelihood that a fight will become a major nuclear war. (Think, for example, of the U.S.-China trade war, which is escalating to the point that Trump thinks his only option is to launch a smaller nuclear bomb, or how Trump might react after a devastating cyberattack on U.S. infrastructure against Beijing.) In October 1986, Gorbachev and Reagan reunited for one of the most extraordinary American-Soviet summits of all time. The two sides almost agree to abolish their offensive nuclear weapons within ten years. The agreement unraveled on the issue of missile testing, with the Soviets in favor of a strict interpretation of the ABM Treaty, limiting research and development to laboratories, and the United States argued for a broad interpretation to develop and test space-based missile defense components. Although it was not possible to reach an agreement in Reykjavik, the measures discussed are considered precursors to subsequent treaties. The U.S. Senate passes the Nunn Lugar Act, which establishes the Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) program.

The programme will provide the States of the former Soviet Union with financial and technical assistance to secure and dismantle nuclear weapons and the stockpiling of fissile material; Remove thousands of warheads from their territories; and to employ nuclear scientists in civilian activities. Since 1991, the CTR program has received more than $5.9 billion annually in defense funding. In May 1992, the former Soviet republics of Belarus, Kazakhstan and Ukraine sign the Lisbon Protocol to the START I Agreement, thus demonstrating their intention to accede to the Non-Proliferation Treaty as non-nuclear-weapon States. The agreement consisted of two agreements. The first was the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty, which limited each country to just two missile defense systems: one for the country`s capital and the other for the protection of an intercontinental missile field. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty has had only limited success in combating the proliferation of nuclear weapons and motivating States to acquire them. . . .